My endometriosis story pt1

I am still trying to post stories of others experiences with hysterectomies or other related issues. Here’s one today that you may want to check out.

endochallenges

Hi everyone.  I would like to defer posting about alternative therapies today in favour of this poignant story sent in by a blog visitor. This young sister has been and is still going through so much and l’m extremely touched by her courage to share her story. Please include her in your prayers

Hi,

I just went through your blog. Saw the ad on Linda lkeji’s blog on one of the comments and decided to check it out. I am deeply touched by your story and the strength and courage you have. It gives me hope.

I am a 21 yr old Nigerian presently studying in England for my Bsc. Ever since l started having my periods at 14, they have always been extremely painful and heavy. I wouldn’t be able to stand or walk, always had unstable body temperatures( one minute l’d be extremely hot and sweating profusely, the…

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Types of Hysterectomy Surgeries

ImageThere are several types of hysterectomy surgeries that can be performed and they all have certain benefits as well as challenges/risks.

Abdominal hysterectomy:  As the name suggests, this surgery involves an incision in your abdomen, often 5-7 inches long.  It may be vertical or horizontal depending on a number of factors.  The recovery time for this type of surgery tends to be the longest out of all of the options.

Vaginal hysterectomy:  The surgeon will make a cut in the vagina and remove your uterus that way.

Laparoscopically-assisted vaginal hysterectomy:  The uterus is still removed through a cut in the vagina but the surgeon will use a laparoscope to assist in this process.  It involves 3-4 small abdominal incisions in order to insert the laparoscope.  The recovery time tends to be shorter with this type of surgery.  This is the procedure I had.

Robotic-assisted hysterectomy:  This is also referred to as the DaVinci method.  It utilizes a small robotic machine that works through small incisions similar to laparoscopic surgery.

There are numerous factors that impact which of these surgeries is best for any given patient including weight, recovery time, and the reason for the hysterectomy.  I will post more about the benefits and challenges of some of these surgeries in a future post.

Why are we losing our lady bits??

What do you think? Are we seeing an increase in these types of surgeries? If so, why do you think that is?

For my own sanity I need to write about this. Write and write. So I need a hysterectomy. I was just typing ‘its really not a big deal’, but it is. And the number of women who have told me in the last month that they have had one is astounding. ASTOUNDING. No, I don’t have cancer, but the risk of it developing is reasonable as long as I keep my lady bits (thanks Rhea for the great moniker) so out they will go.  Not planning on having kids and no more periods so its all good from that point of view, I suppose.

I am so alarmed that so many women are having this done. That’s just not right! What is going on that our reproductive systems are overloaded, creating abnormalities, putting our lives at risk and being deemed best removed?? You would not believe the stories I’ve heard…

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Types of Hysterectomy

This appears to be one of the most misunderstood aspects of hysterectomy.  I was not clear on this either, before I had a hysterectomy.  I found people would hear about my surgery and then would label it with terms that they were familiar with but did not accurately describe my surgery.  Here are the three types of hysterectomy surgeries as found on the Mayo Clinic Site:Image

Supra-cervical hysterectomy (also referred to as a partial or subtotal hysterectomy): This is the removal of the upper part of the uterus only and leaves the cervix in place (first image pictured above).

Total hysterectomy:  This involves the removal of the uterus and cervix and is the procedure I had (bottom left image).  However, if I told people I had a total hysterectomy they assumed that meant the removal of ‘everything’ which is actually a:

Radical hysterectomy: involve removal of the uterus, cervix, fallopian tubes and ovaries (far right image).  This occurs most often when cancer is present.

To add to the confusion, these are types of hysterectomy based on what is removed.  Types of hysterectomy can also be classified based on the type of surgery performed.  More on that in the next post!

It Turns on a Dime

Here’s another woman’s story as she deals with an upcoming hysterectomy.

Fit, Fresh, and Funny

Just wanted to write down some quick thoughts about a pretty big thing that happened to me today. Had my post op appt with my doctor for my laser laparoscopy last month. It’s been a few weeks since the operation, so I was kind of surprised it was so late, but it gave me a good chance to sit down with my doctor and really talk about what has made me have 8 surgeries in 12 years. Well, we talked about it and decided the best way for me to avoid future pain and future surgeries is to go ahead and have a partial hysterectomy/left side oophorectomy. I’m still relatively young, but my progression of the disease (endometriosis) has been “extensive” in his words, and the reality is that having kids biologically would be an uphill battle and probably be terribly hard on my body. So November 30th I’m having…

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Hysterectomy – The Basics

Here is a great summary of the general information that is helpful when considering a hysterectomy.  Over the next several weeks, I hope to break down this information in even more detail. For example, what are the reasons for a hysterectomy and what are the main risk factors.  Check in during this time to get more information on the topics mentioned here.Image

Hysterectomy

Description

During a hysterectomy, the surgeon may remove the entire uterus or just part of it. The fallopian tubes and ovaries may also be removed.

Types of hysterectomy:

  • Partial (supracervical) hysterectomy: The upper part of the uterus is removed. The cervix is left in place.
  • Total hysterectomy: The entire uterus and cervix are removed.
  • Radical hysterectomy: The uterus, cervix upper part of the vagina, and tissue on both sides of the cervix are removed. This is most often done if you have cancer.

Your doctor will help you decide which type of hysterectomy is best for you. The choice often depends on your medical history and reason for the surgery.

Why the Procedure is Performed

There are many reasons a woman may need a hysterectomy. The procedure may be recommended if you have:

Hysterectomy is a major surgery. It is possible that your condition may be treated without this major surgery. Talk with your doctor or nurse about all your treatment options. Less invasive procedures include:

Risks

Risks of any surgery are:

Risks of a hysterectomy are:

  • Injury to the bladder or ureters
  • Pain during sexual intercourse
  • Early menopause if the ovaries are removed
  • Decreased interest in sex
  • Increased risk of heart disease if the ovaries are removed before menopause

Ask your doctor if taking estrogen can help lower the risk of heart disease and help menopause symptoms.

Before the Procedure

Before deciding to have a hysterectomy, ask your doctor or nurse what to expect after the procedure. Many women who have had a hysterectomy notice changes in their body and in how they feel about themselves. Talk with your doctor, nurse, family, and friends about these possible changes before you have surgery.

Tell your health care team about all the medicines you are taking. These include herbs, supplements, and other medicines you bought without a prescription.

During the days before the surgery:

  • You may be asked to stop taking aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), clopidogrel (Plavix), warfarin (Coumadin), and any other drugs like these.
  • Ask your doctor which drugs you should still take on the day of your surgery.
  • If you smoke, try to stop. Ask your doctor or nurse for help quitting.

On the day of your surgery:

  • You will usually be asked not to drink or eat anything for 8 hours before the surgery.
  • Take any medicines your doctor told you to take with a small sip of water.
  • Arrive at the hospital on time.

After the Procedure

After surgery, you will be given pain medicines to relieve any discomfort.

You may also have a tube, called a catheter, inserted into your bladder to pass urine. The catheter will likely be removed before you go home.

You will be asked to get up and move around as soon as possible after surgery. This helps prevent blood clots from forming in your legs and speeds recovery.

You will be asked to get up to use the bathroom as soon as you are able. You may return to a normal diet as soon as you can without causing nausea or vomiting.

How long you stay in the hospital depends on the type of hysterectomy.

  • You can likely go home the next day when surgery is done through the vagina using a laparoscope or after robotic surgery.
  • When a larger surgical cut (incision) in the abdomen is made, you may need to stay in the hospital 1 to 2 days. You may need to stay longer if the hysterectomy is done because of cancer.

Outlook (Prognosis)

How long it takes you to recover depends on the type of hysterectomy. Average recovery times are:

  • Abdominal hysterectomy: 4 to 6 weeks
  • Vaginal hysterectomy: 3 to 4 weeks
  • Robot-assisted or total laparoscopic hysterectomy: 2 to 4 weeks

A hysterectomy will cause menopause if you also have your ovaries removed. Removal of the ovaries can also lead to a decreased sex drive. Your doctor may recommend estrogen replacement therapy. Discuss with your doctor the risks and benefits of this therapy.

If the hysterectomy was done for cancer, you may need further treatment.

Retrieved from: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002915.htm